When Good Enough is Better than Perfect…

While working on a project for my house the other day, I did something I seldom have been able to do. I received some furniture for a second bedroom, and was partially painting the pieces to contemporize them a bit. One piece was a dresser/mirror combo. All of the pieces were too feminine for me, so I gave them a more masculine feel by painting part of them a metallic bronze color. (Thanks Martha Stewart and Home Depot for the paint color!) The mirror was white with a plastic, ribony flair that I wanted to highlight by painting a thin strip in the bronze color. Because the material was plastic, I had to paint the strip with white primer so the bronze would stick. I began the white right after work one day, and although it was somewhat intricate work, I was pleased with the result. I let it dry for a day before beginning with the bronze. I purchased small paint brushes… like artists would use… because I knew a smaller brush would work better than what I normally use. They worked really well for the white, so I didn’t anticipate any problem with the bronze.

The next day after work, I began to use the bronze paint…. oy….. I had great difficulty. I could paint neither straight, nor a smooth curve, and I was getting frustrated. One of the problems I usually face when doing something new, or intricate, is that I touch it too much. I want it perfect, so I try to make it better than it is. I get hyper-critical, and can’t quit messing with it. The result is usually worse after the touch-up than before. “Next time, I just need to leave it alone after the first attempt.” I tell myself afterward. So… THIS time… I realized my hand was getting shaky, and my concentration was lagging. I was losing the “flow.” Typically, I would try to “power through” the fatigue. This time…. I quit!

YES!

I left it alone!

I accepted that now wasn’t the right time to do my best work, and I walked away. Rather than allowing my own impatience to finish the piece, and see my vision of what the mirror would look like completed, I instead patiently walked away so I could come back another day when I could do a better job. Yea, me!

So I came back and completed it when I was fresh on the weekend…. Right?

Weeellllll……. not so much. It is still sitting out in my workshop. I am not happy with it AT ALL! To me, it looks like crap! Good idea…. poor craftsmanship. Oh well…. it will sit there until I get another, maybe better idea to salvage it.

I confess, I have usually not been content with “good enough” because I had this vision of what “perfection” SHOULD be. And it has been difficult to accept and enjoy the Good because I was searching for the Perfect!

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I have been reading Richard Rohr’s book, Falling Upward: A Spirituality for the Two Halves of Life. Wow! A wonderful book so far. Rohr begins the introduction with this statement:

“There is much evidence on several levels that there are at least two major tasks to human life. The first task is to build a strong “container” or identity; the second is to find the contents that the container was meant to hold. The first task we take for granted as the very purpose of life, which does not mean we do it well. The second task, I am told, is more encountered than sought; few arrive at it with much preplanning, purpose, or passion. So you might wonder if there is much point in providing a guide to the territory ahead of time. Yet that is exactly why we must. It is vitally important to know what is coming and being offered to all of us.

We are a “first-half-of-life culture,” largely concerned about surviving successfully. Probably most cultures and individuals across history have been situated in the first half of their own development up to now, because it is all they had time for. We all try to do what seems like the task that life first hands us: establishing an identity, a home, relationships, friends, community, security, and building a proper platform for our only life.

But it takes us much longer to discover “the task within the task,” as I like to call it: what are we really doing when we are doing what we are doing.” (Pg. xii-xiv)

I especially like Rohr’s take that we spend the first part of life in survival-mode, while the second half of life is unconcerned with survival. Rohr suggests that many times, the second half of life is precipitated by a significant loss or wound.

We fall…

We realize our fallibility…

We are introduced to our mortality…

We face the certainty that some of our dreams will never be experienced and we are called to release them…

It also is a time of using what we have found about ourselves during the first half of our life. And using what we have learned about what really is important in life. Rohr suggests that we must learn the rules before we can determine which ones to ignore or break. What we learn, is then to be used in service of others. We become Elders… the Explainers of life to our communities. Unfortunately, our culture tends to ignore Elders, or maybe there aren’t many actual Elders around. We seem to keep pursuing security as we grow older in our culture.

What if we feared death less, the closer we got to it?

That is the value of the wound, which begins our journey into the second-half of life. Rohr mentions that “most of us in the first half of life suspect that all is not fully working.” (Pg. xvii) Eventually we feel that there is more or should be more to life than living in the gopher wheel. These feelings usually rise somewhere in middle-age…. whatever that is…. although I have found people as young as their late 20’s that feel that way before they begin to invest themselves in a process which seems so frustratingly selfish and consumeristic. Some of these young friends begin in a more organic way, trying to live in better balance with themselves, others, the planet, and for some, even God. However, eventually they meet someone, fall in love, and invariably children come along with new discussions about

school districts,

and lead paint,

and pre-schools,

and commutes,

and bills,

and….. here we go running because the wheel is moving, which is moving because we are running…

and one child leads to two, which leads to two jobs for….. well…. somebody….

and we need MORE ROOM!

and ANOTHER CAR!

………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….

I went to a customer’s house today to spray for bugs (my new job) and her children were home from pre-school because they were both sick. I saw some baby items laying by one of the doors to be taken out, and I said so the youngest child could hear me, “No more babies in THIS house!” The young mother said with exuberance, “That’s right! No more babies in THIS house, are there Katy? No more pacifiers… no more cribs…”

Katy was no longer a baby.

I mentioned to the mother that this was kind of a threshold. She agreed. And said that she was kind of sad that there were no more babies in her house. Her husband, however, was quite glad…

……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………

The young mother was catching a fleeting glimpse of the line in life she was crossing over, and she wasn’t quite ready to let it go yet. Something wasn’t “fully working,” and she didn’t want to go on without fully realizing the significance of this moment with her girls….

But…

children grow up…

as they should…

to face new obstacles…

and accomplish new feats…

and the wheel keeps turning…

…so the baby things must be stored away…

…and that is good…

But…

eventually…

our feet don’t move quite so fast…

or someone trips us up…

or life throws an unbreakable rod of steel into the wheel…

like cancer…

like an affair…

like an addiction…

and we fall…

But the fall doesn’t have to be fatal. It can be the end of one journey, and the beginning of a new journey. In fact, the first journey helps to prepare us for the second.

There have been first journey skills that I haven’t done so well. I am being given an opportunity to develop those skills, but to be honest, I am not really confident in doing them very well. Honestly, my task right now, is to do them well enough! They don’t have to be perfect. What I am trying to learn is what the contents are within the container of my first journey, as Rohr puts it. I can keep working so hard on the skills which aren’t perfect… to keep polishing them with such intensity… that I am pre-occupied with them to the detriment of using the contents of my life, in service of other people. So, maybe these skills are good enough. And maybe their imperfection actually allows me to lean more heavily on God. As the Apostle Paul puts it: my weakness, then becomes my strength! I suspect that a quality of the second journey is to be informed by the first journey, yet not continue to try and fix it. My dad always used to say that we must leave the past in the past.

I can remember that.

I think…

A Dream Shared…

I was thinking about dreams the other day. Most of my dreams seem to be about:

how things SHOULD be…

what it would be like if…

one day I see myself…

how would the world be better…

life would make more sense if…

Well…. to be honest…. there is also the one where I have a cup of coffee with a certain brunette… but…. nevermind.

Anyway….

Sometimes these kinds of thoughts begin with a picture of what life COULD be like. Some kind of deep longing brings a picture of a better tomorrow. I suppose if I were to classify dreams, I would choose at least two categories:

Personal Dreams and Dreams in Community…

Personal dreams are the ones in which your personal passions find their deepest expression through activities or events which touch something deep within. These dreams certainly may be shared, but I suspect they are linked with those closest to us. The hope for these dreams tie our talents and interests to a certain type of life… a creative force deep within which desires to be unleashed in order to grow and bear fruit. They are different in that they come from who we are and with the promise of self-fulfillment and the expression of which brings a joy and contentment with who we are created to be. We lose track of time in the expression of these dreams. They are unique to “me” and their expression brings deep joy which comes from the very doing because it comes from our “being”. Artists know these dreams, as do athletes, or anyone who puts their whole being into the doing of something.

Dreams in Community are ones which capture a certain vision which is generative and draws people together. These dreams call forth a better world in which others share. They draw on the experiences of ourselves and others to form healthy, growing communities.

In “The Call”, Os Guiness quotes T.E. Lawrence from his book, “Seven Pillars of Wisdom”:

“All men dream: but not equally. Those who dream by night in the dusty recesses of their minds wake to find it was vanity: but the dreamers of the day are dangerous men, for they act their dreams with open eyes, to make it possible.” pg 175

I think most dreams begin in tension between what is and what could be. It is easy to be a bit embarrassed about our dreams; even to ridicule them: “Surely someone has thought about this before. It probably isn’t possible…” Society certainly can add to our own ridiculing inner voice. How many inventors are scared off by the crowd of wiseguys, who roll their eyes, shake their heads, and speak disparagingly while sitting on their courage… Or, even worse, the people who smile condescendingly, nod politely, while waiting for the dreamer to leave so they can begin to laugh…

Sharing a dream can be kind of scary.

Sometimes, a dream shared can turn into a dream lost. The movie “Social Network” purports to tell the story of a dream that was stolen. Depending on which person’s spin doctor you believe, the dream of Facebook was shared between four friends and either:

1. The idea was changed and developed into something better

or

2. The idea was stolen outright by a false, egomaniacal friend.

Now the dream is going to court to determine who really dreamed it and how much it will cost.

Certainly it could be said that at least one person connected with the invention of Facebook became a “dreamer in the day,” as Guinness puts it. It also can be observed that the sharing of the dream meant that the dream itself exploded into a much larger reality than any of the dreamers expected. Dreams which are shared can grow. They find other dreamers which add their own unique expressions to them. Facebook was and is an ongoing Dream in Community. When this kind of dreaming happens, the original dreamer must release their hold on the dream. Holding tightly to a Dream in Community strangles it. Actually, in order for the Dream in Community to become reality, it must be given away in faith to the One who gave the dream in the first place.

Sometimes, the greatest dreams…:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=smEqnnklfYs

…can be dangerous to the dreamer:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Zb9EjHXyJc&feature=related

Dreams carry risk. Dreams also carry with them a cost to the dreamer. The more important the dream and pervasive its impact; the greater the risk and the higher the price. Some dreams are perpetually unfolding, as a Morning Glory to the sun at dawn. However, the process of the unfolding introduces the sweet aroma of its beauty, and many share in the wondrous quality of it. Some dreams introduce each of us to others in deeper ways….

… or at least that is the hope of the dreamer…

…and the dream giver…

From the Inside Out…

For the majority of my life, I lived from the outside in. The best phrase to describe my mindset was: “Do what you gotta do.” I don’t mean to say that I didn’t work hard, or was constantly looking for the easy way out, I just understood life to be filled with immovable obstacles which must be scaled or hiked around in order to go…. where? Although I had dreams for the future and wanted my life to count for something, I didn’t really know what that “something” was. I didn’t take the time to identify or define my hopes and dreams, because I was busy living life as defined by someone else or by what I perceived I was expected to do.

Finally, somewhere around the age of 43, I began to ask the question, “What do I believe?” In effect,  I began the process of redefining the foundations of my faith and life. Although I have written about this in several other posts, I must again say that I formerly built my life… that is …. how I defined myself… upon an equation: church+family+performance=worth. I judged whether my life had significance by my perceptions of what others thought about me surrounding the issues on the left side of the equation. Eventually, all the outter voices grew silent  as each piece of the left side: church… family… performance… fell with a great crash. And God’s grace took their place while I began the painful process of a personal re-mix.

When we reach the mid-point of  life, we begin to question whether the first part was valuable. Sometimes, a particularly unexpected event can also bring us to a point of redefinition, such as divorce, a job loss, or health crisis. The movie “Up In The Air” makes the point really well.

 George Clooney plays Ryann Bingham. Bingham’s job is to fire people. Companies hire Bingham’s employer to “handle” the process of laying people off when they decide to downsize their employee pool. Ryann meets with each person, delivers the news, and presents a package which will help them transition into new employment. A really, really tough job. But Bingham loves his job, because he gets to travel all over the world and build up his air miles. Bingham always uses the same air carrier, and is awarded additional perks with each milestone he passes. His ultimate goal is to reach the ten million mile mark, which has only been accomlished by one person. However, just as he is on the cusp of reaching his goal, the president of his company decides they can cut costs by going to video conferencing instead of doing person-to-person exit interviews. The president hires a young woman, fresh from an MBA program, who has developed the program he wants to implement. However, because the woman has no real life experience in the field, Ryann’s boss pairs her with him to learn the business.

Natalie Keener, the MBA grad, has developed a program, complete with a script and list of responses to questions offered by the employees being fired.  At the boss’s direction, after only one trip in which Natalie observes Ryann, Bingham is forced to allow her to take the lead in the face-to-face meetings.

Natalie’s first client is a man in his late 40’s to early 50’s. He is sullen, sarcastic, and aggressive. While she tries to read through her script, he interrupts, and she can’t find responses on her list to meet his sarcasm. Finally, he asks, “What am I gonna tell my kids?” Natalie remains silent, intimidated by the man’s question and by her own feelings of empathy for his pain. Bingham takes over:

http://www.imdb.com/video/screenplay/vi3748923161/

I finished a book that has been very fundamental to me: “The Gifted Adult.” I find myself going back to it often. I learn something and begin to implement it until, invariably, I get stuck. So I go back to the book. Recently, I have been working on living from the inside out. As Bingham mentioned to the guy getting fired, remembering what we have loved to do in the past can be the path forward. God has designed each of us to love certain things, and mining these loves or passions out of ourselves is a lifelong process. When I look across the span of my life, for instance, certain recurring themes pop up. I have learned that we sometimes need to go to the past in order to go forward. That is what living from the inside out is all about. So I’ve begun to question what my loves are, and to work towards them.

When my son, Baird, was about 5, we went to a small county fair in a little Missouri town. Eventually, we found the carnival and I figured Baird was old enough to ride the Octopus with me. The Octopus  has little egg-shaped capsules in which the riders sit, located at the end of long spidery arms connected to a center pivot. When the ride begins, the arms both spin around the center pivot and go up and down. Since the capsule also freely spins, the combination of movements leads to a chaotic spinning of both the capsule and the equilibrium of the riders.

 The carney in charge of the ride openned the front of the capsule by pulling a pin which allowed the front of the capsule to pivot downward. The capsule nose was partly open, with a couple stairs upon which we crawled up to the seat. As soon as we were sitting down, the carney lifted the front of the capsule, replaced the pin, and sent us spinning in the capsule by giving it a strong shove. As soon as we stopped spinning, I noticed that one of the bars, which protrude part way across the openning in the nose of the capsule, was missing. I didn’t think much about it at the time, other than the thought that repairs needed to be done, and about how much money they actually spent on maintenance. However, as the ride began, I soon realized that we weren’t belted in and that the bar was an important component to keeping the two of us in the capsule!

The ride was wild! Wilder than I remembered it, probably due to the fact that I was trying to hold my 5-year-old son and keep the two of us from flying out of the capsule. Up and down we bounced, all the while spinning. A couple of times, I was sure we were on the verge of flying out of the capsule. As  the ride slowed to a stop, I promised myself that I would NEVER ride another small-town-carnival-that-moves-every-five-days-so-the-fittings-of-each-ride-get-worn-from-constant-set-up-and-tear-down rides in my life. And I never have, either.

However…

There have been several days, weeks, and years where my life felt the same way as my experience on the ride.

Jerked this way and that by forces outside of my control.

Seeing a possible problem, but deciding to “ride it out”…

Watching my kids riding the same forces, and wanting to control their experience, yet knowing I had limited control…

Making promises to myself…

Walking away shaken, tired, and bruised…

Giving away the responsibility of my life to others and relying on them to make decisions for my life…

Feeling like the ball in a pinball machine…

Blaming others rather than taking responsibility for past decisions…

But…

I am learning new ways of living. I am taking tentative steps in the process of living from the inside out! Two key components of which are:

My daily interactions with God. I am experiencing the reality of living every day as if it were an ongoing conversation with God. I am learning of the transparency of my life to God. Nothing hidden, because it cannot be. What is so cool about that is, I am aware of God’s grace constantly. That awareness is very freeing. Kind of a return to Pre-serpent Eden in a relational sense.

Secondly, as I walk through life with God, I discover how I am designed. He doesn’t TELL me what I love and am gifted in, He allows me the joy of discovering myself. Sometimes I am surprised when I find something that piques my interest. My mind keeps coming back to it, and I am perplexed because I never really cared about it in the past. So I go on this mini-adventure of self-discovery, and it’s cool! Invariably, I come across someone else with the same interest, we talk, my interest grows, and I meet a new friend! Very cool!

I must confess that living from the outside in for so many years has helped me become extremely adaptable. In fact, it is now one of my strengths. And being adaptable can be quite handy at times, but I want to learn to use it while living in my sweet spot.

That’s how I want to live the last part of my life….

Faith to Receive…

A couple months ago, I finally saw the movie, “Pay it Forward.” The premise of the movie is that giving something we have that others  need can change the world. In the movie, a seventh grade teacher gives an assignment for his students to come up with an idea that can change the world. One of the students, a small boy who lives with his hard working, single mother in a poor neighborhood, thinks long and hard about the assignment as he goes about his day to day life. He gets an idea, and begins to act on it. The idea being: Find three people and do a favor for them, asking them to do a favor for three other people rather than repay you.  The belief behind the idea is that kindness keeps on giving, changing lives in the process.

It takes courage to be kind and generous, but  giving keeps on giving. Meanness does eventually have a limit, but generosity and grace and forgiveness lives on and expands. However, sometimes the recipient of another person’s kindness can be very cautious of the giver’s intentions. Life seems to reinforce the addage: “There ain’t no free lunch…” Cynicism grips our heart in its icy, tightening grasp. We are tempted to mistrust the person giving us something we need. We expect there to be a catch. We are defensive, protecting ourselves from the very kindness we need. Usually, we need faith to receive. Faith in the person giving. We need to believe in their open benevolence.

I have come to a crossroads in my life. There are options open to me and I must choose which way. Admittedly, I have been reluctant to expect the goodness in life recently. For several years, I have listened for the other shoe to drop. “Things are going well right now, it’s about time for something unpleasant.” I would say to myself. My expectations were very low, and they usually were fulfilled. Living in this manner left me in a rut… a rut is a grave with the ends kicked out. Frankly, I didn’t trust life, myself, or God to provide good things.

But somewhere along the line, I began to understand that I was afraid of the good things in life. Afraid they would be taken away eventually. Afraid that if I risked… put myself out there… that I would fail.  I find this a really sad way to live. So I began asking God to give me faith to trust Him. Faith in myself and my gifts. Faith in God, my children and family… that they love me and want the best for me.

I asked God to give me faith to receive the life He has for me. My prayer has been for faith to receive his provision even though I can’t see it now. Faith like Abraham… to leave where you have known and been known on the promise of a new home while trusting God knows the end of the journey and has provision not only at the final destination, but along the way. Faith to receive both the good and painful. For the painful has invaluable things to teach us and also must be received. So does hunger… and loneliness/seperation, and loss.

 Thankfully, we also learn from the good. Gratitude is our response to the good that God has given us. We learn how much God loves us as we look around our lives and measure the depths of His good gifts.

Faith receives everything that is part of the journey and trusts it is just what we need. Because faith is tied to the love of God.

I started lifting weights a couple months ago… although… I…. haven’t been… in awhile……

Anyway, when I lift, the muscle tissue actually tears and then must heal. When it heals, it is stronger. Blood rushes to the tissue and brings the needed nutrients to repair and strengthen the minute injuries. That is how the body works. Our lives are no different. We grow stronger as we are stretched and torn. While the body needs rest and food to provide nutrients from outside sources, we each need to replenish our souls in activities which we enjoy… good things in our daily routine also enable growth.

What is sometimes bothersome to me in life, though, is that you don’t often see the “results” as you do with your body. Or, maybe not the results you were hoping for…thought were what you needed… But maybe in life, as in lifting weights, other people close to us notice it sooner than we do. And maybe that’s part of the reason it is actually “faith.”

Also in lifting weights, you make gains quickly at first, but there comes a time when you plateau. The same effort doesn’t seem to be getting results.  So you have to change up your routine and add different exercises. Your muscle memory and habits must  adapt to new challenges.

Our lives are no different. Doing the same thing and expecting something different is insanity, so when life changes, we must believe God is changing the exercises. Our response of faith is like continuing to go to the gym, even when we don’t feel the difference. So we receive the change without knowing why, yet trust in the long range purposes of God. We trust that God desires good for us, and wants to give us a fruitful life, out of which we joyfully give to others.

Although I don’t know what it is yet, I know a change is gonna come…

Come Sail Away…

 “I’m sailing away… Set an open course for the virgin sea.”

Styx sent this song sailing in 1978, I think. I bought the album… that’s right… round vinyl album… in a cardboard sleeve. I loved that album. I can’t help thinking about the first line of the song and how it applies to where my life is right now. One of the good/bad things about divorce is the freedom it can bring. For me at least, leaving part of the past behind brings the possibility of a new direction. I have wanted a new direction and location. Now the process begins to look into the vastness of the rolling waves and begin to figure out which direction to go… And there’s the rub.

Not long ago, a friend wrote me the following:

“Hey, I have an idea. Would you consider writing about the future? Not necessarily exactly what you want it to look like, but dreams and hopes, or just the small things that people might relate to? Maybe just little glimpses, snap shots of the more pleasant aspects of future hopes – those not surrounded with fear – not related to current struggles; but sort of a vision of after. In life coaching, they emphasize the importance of “creating a vision” and “bridging the gap” for people so that they have something compelling to strive for. I know we’ve discussed the importance of focusing on the present and doing what needs to be done now. And that is vital, I know. Well, I’m not even entirely sure what I mean. But maybe that will spark something in your creativity? “

Truthfully, I have always had dreams/visions of the future. Most of the ideas centered on entrepreneurial programs or a life style filled with free time to fill with my interests: writing, photography, design, etc. But the problem was always how to pay the bills. However, the last three years have helped me to focus in on the voyage itself and my relationships. People have become more important than programs. I hope to find and share love again. My sister told me once, that I would find a woman who would think that I was more than “OK,” but… “She will think you are wonderful.” At the time she said that, my soul soaked in the possibility. Could I dare hope to find that? We will see…

My kids are practically adults, but there is still a need for Dad. I know that because my own father was killed in an accident when I was in college. There have been so many times in the past 25 years I would have loved to call him, or see him. I need his advice at times. I want to share with him ideas. I hope to be the father to my adult kids that I never had. Not intrusive, but there when they need me. We all need to know there is someone, somewhere that is on our side, no matter what. I will be that for my kids.

And then there is God… In the past, when I have thought of God, I usually associated Him with activities or a life mission. My thoughts would obsess over what I would do for God/others; or more honestly, what God WANTED me to do in life. I rarely answered that question for very long before another idea/vision/dream would creep into my mind, and then off I would go in pursuit. I have come to believe that God doesn’t have a set “plan” with my name on it that I must find. In other words, a comprehensive, all encompassing picture into which I must find my way. In Genesis, God worked with Adam in a creative, generative manner. They worked together in naming the animals. God didn’t give Adam a mission, and then say “OK…git ‘er done!” God didn’t leave Adam alone to accomplish a plan by himself. Actually, although “all the earth is the Lord’s and everything in it…” God gave Adam the responsibility to manage it. But the whole process was meant to be done together. The point wasn’t the Task… The point was the Friendship! God valued Adam so much, that He allowed Adam to use the creativity within himself. Adam trusted God to do what only God could do, and then responded with his own creative action. So…

What does that look like in my life?

My natural response to that question is to develop a process of personal inquiry. Have there been common threads woven throughout my life?

Threads of dreams?

Threads of talents?

Threads of action?

 Threads of passion?

Threads of perspective?

I have been looking in the past for direction into the future. And I see many common threads… both in strengths and weaknesses. I must honestly say that I have historically concentrated on my weaknesses. I can get intimidated by my perception of my own insufficiency.

Now… if someone were to use the above statement conversationally with me, I’m certain I would say something like…

“The truth is (name incerted), we are all insufficient. We each need others to supply the lack in our lives. The most fundamental supplier is God. Growing in life isn’t concentrating on correcting our weaknesses, but minimizing the damage of those weaknesses by finding someone gifted in our weak areas and partnering with them, then living actively in our strengths and generously giving them to others…”

Dang… that sounds good. It’s good advice, too… to someone else… But honestly, I find it hard to trust myself. Taking the strategy I would help someone else develop and then implementing that same plan in my own life is frustrating. There are many directions into which I could go, but thinning down the possibilities is very difficult.

Where do I give myself best?

 In what would I be most effective?

What do I love?

 Those might not be hard questions for some people, but I have consistantly had difficulty staying fixed on a direction. I know confidence is a large part of the equation. 

However,  its time to leave all that behind.

God is the maker of the sea and He stands ready by the wheel…